Russian army of the Napoleonic wars
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Russian army of the Napoleonic wars by Albert Seaton

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Published by Osprey Publishing in Reading .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Russia

Subjects:

  • Russia. Armii͡a︡ -- Uniforms.,
  • Russia. Armii͡a︡ -- History.,
  • Russia -- History, Military -- 1801-1917.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementtext by Albert Seaton; colour plates by Michael Youens.
SeriesMen-at-arms series
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDK53 .S4
The Physical Object
Pagination40, [8] p.
Number of Pages40
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5087933M
ISBN 100850451221
LC Control Number74159282

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The Russian Army of the Napoleonic Wars book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. This book recounts the development of a standing R /5(8). This book recounts the development of a standing Russian army from the end of the 16th century to the million strong force that resisted Napoleon. The Russians were heavily defeated at the battle of Austerliz but in the Armistice period that followed the Russians regrouped and several improvements were made. In when Napoleon invaded this new army was protected at . During the Napoleonic era, Russia possessed a vast force of cavalry, forming a greater percentage than that of most European armies. This stemmed partly from their service against the Turks, who had huge numbers of troops, and partly from the fact that much Russian terrain was suitable for the manoeuvre of large bodies of cavalry/5(14). By withdrawing, the Russian Army preserved its combat strength, eventually allowing it to force Napoleon out of the country. The Battle of Borodino on September 7 was the bloodiest day of battle in the Napoleonic Wars. The Russian Army could Location: Russian Empire.

In the Russian army was as vast as the territory from which it was drawn. The College of War calculated that the regular army amounted to , men, p enrolled cossacks, and at least a further , irregular cavalry which could be mobilised in time of war. Inspired by the icons paraded by their priests before battle, the Russian infantry were capable of . The regular army was huge and was supplemented on home soil by they vast numbers of 'Irregulars' incuding cossacks, partisans, various militia and asiatics. This guide currently only considers the regu-lar army. Attempting to model the Russian army of the Napoleonic wars is made more difficult by a number of changes in organisation and uniform.   The Russian Army of the Napoleonic Wars: Infantry, No.1 by Philip J. Haythornthwaite, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(9). “This is a valuable book: it introduces new features of Napoleonic Russia to the non-specialist, it strikes a good thematic balance between domestic and foreign policy, and between society, economics and politics; and for all the vastness of its subject, it nonetheless conveys a sense of how the ordinary Russian experienced this turbulent period.” (Michael Rowe, , .

The Russian Army of the Napoleonic Wars (1): Infantry – - Ebook written by Philip Haythornthwaite. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read The Russian Army of the Napoleonic Wars (1): Infantry –Author: Philip Haythornthwaite. Part of the "Men-At-Arms" series, this book looks at the cavalry forces of the Russian army of the Napoleonic Wars, illustrating their weapons, equipment and uniforms. Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Inspired by the icons paraded by their priests before battle, the Russian infantry were capable of astonishing feats and total, blind obedience to orders. Philip Haythornwaite examines the organisation and uniforms of the remarkable Russian infantry troops who fought in the Napoleonic Wars (). About this book: During the Napoleonic era, Russia possessed a vast force of cavalry, forming a greater percentage than that of most European armies. This stemmed partly from their service against the Turks, who had huge numbers of troops, and partly from the fact that much Russian terrain was suitable for the manoeuvre of large bodies of cavalry.